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Zsidó élet Magyarországon
Author(s): Kovács András és Forrás-Biró Aletta
Date: 14 September 2011

This qualitative study, by the leading sociologist of Hungarian Jewry, examines the views of a cross section of Hungarian Jewish leaders, and calls for infrastructural reform in the Hungarian Jewish community. Originally written in English, this is the Hungarian language translation.


Juedisches Leben in Deutschland
Author(s): Toby Axelrod
Date: 18 December 2013

Written by a leading journalist specialising in German Jewish life, this study is based on the views of a cross-section of German Jewish leaders, and explores some of the key challenges confronting the community. Originally written in English, this is the German language translation.


Jewish life in Germany
Author(s): Toby Axelrod
Date: 18 December 2013

A detailed look at Jewish life in Germany based on interviews with German Jewish leaders. It explores how Jewish life has changed in Germany since the fall of the Berlin Wall, and the challenges posed by the huge influx of Jews and their families from the Former Soviet Union.


Is Europe good for the Jews?
Author(s): Steven Beller
Date: 22 April 2008

A new study which looks at the ‘new antisemitism’ in Europe and asks whether Europe is still a good place for Jews to live. Steven Beller argues that the impulse to sound the alarm is misplaced, especially when aimed at ‘Europe’ itself.


The attitudes of Jews in Britain towards Israel
Author(s): David Graham and Jonathan Boyd
Date: 15 July 2010

The first national survey to examine British Jewish attitudes to Israel in depth.  It demonstrates that British Jews are strongly attached to the country, and whilst deeply concerned about Israel's security needs, they are also eager to see compromises made in the quest for peace.


Key findings from the 2011 National Jewish Student Survey
Author(s): David Graham and Jonathan Boyd
Date: 04 October 2011

The first study of Jewish student identity in the UK. It demonstrates that certain universities are particularly popular among Jews, and shows that whilst anti-Israel activity at university is of some concern, most Jewish students are comfortable being open about their Jewishness on campus.


Jews in the United Kingdom in 2013
Author(s): David Graham, L. D. Staetsky and Jonathan Boyd
Date: 24 February 2014

JPR’s preliminary findings report from the 2013 National Jewish Community Survey reveals a community in which younger Jews are more religious than older Jews, the traditional middle-ground is shrinking, and people are more likely to be moving away from religiosity than towards it.


Immigration from the United Kingdom to Israel
Author(s): L. D. Staetsky, Marina Sheps & Jonathan Boyd
Date: 25 September 2013

Written in partnership with Israel's Central Bureau of Statistics and drawing on their data and the UK Census, this study takes an in-depth look at the numbers and characteristics of Jews who have immigrated to Israel since 1948.


Jews of the 'new South Africa'
Author(s): Barry Kosmin, Jacqueline Goldberg, Milton Shain and Shirley Bruk
Date: 03 February 1999

South African Jews, with their high level of general education and exposure to Western culture, combined with a relatively high level of religious observance and education, are an interesting community in which to test out how Jewish beliefs and values are operationalized in the social world.


A community of communities (full report)
Author(s): Commission on representation of the interests of the British Jewish community
Date: 31 March 2000

This report was the result of more than eighteen months of research and deliberations during which the Commission canvassed as many people as possible within the Jewish community, together with those in the wider society who are the main target audiences of Jewish representation.